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The Red Pill

White Privilege: Inheritance, Education and Employment

  Despite there being entire University departments seemingly devoted, in one way or another, to “white privilege”, the arguments for it are actually fairly simple. Once you move away from the purported experience, the claims of psychological hardship and the artistic and trance-like inductions to walk in the shoes of the oppressed, it’s actually a fairly small set and (mostly) easily verifiable / falsifiable claims.

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America Is Not a “Proposition Nation”

When I was studying French in school we used an elementary reader that was published in France ages ago. On one page it had the pictures of the peoples of different nations with their corresponding names in French. These pictures were stereotypes—French, German, English, American, African, Chinese, Egyptian, etc.—of the demographic reality that existed. Those people were their nations, and needless to say, each person representing a European country was white. What is a nation? It is not defined by political boundaries but by its people. The Oxford Dictionaries define a nation as “a large aggregate of people united by common descent, …

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MAOA, Race, and Crime

One gene which plays a role in Black’s high crime rate is the monoamine oxidase -a gene (MAO-A). This gene produces an enzyme by the same name. The enzyme MAO-A breaks down a class of neurotransmitter called mono-amines in the brain. These neurotransmitters include ones which are well known to effect behavior such as dopamine and serotonin. Some versions of the MAO-A gene lead to lower levels of MAO-A the enzyme and, therefore, more mono-amine activity in the brain.

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IQs of East Asians

One of the major arguments against heredetarianism is the claim that East Asians’ higher IQs than Europeans is merely a result of effort, and are in fact an example of effort raising the IQ of an entire group by about 4 points relative to 100, which is presumably what they would score if they were as “lazy” as Europeans.

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Women’s Brains

Here is a very interesting paper on sex differences in brain size and intelligence, notable for linking people’s brain scans with their detailed intelligence test results. It has been accepted for publication in Intelligence.

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First Worldism: The European Revolution

There is something I want to share with “fellow Europeans”, and it is something hard to describe. It is to, in a moment, “feel” the past. How can I convey this? How can I show this? Around 7700 BC, white skin had “reached fixation”, or the highest prevalence in the genome until today or some later decline, in modern-day Sweden. Some time around 3500 BC, white skin reached fixation in the rest of Europe. I don’t say this because white skin is super-important (though melanin is a hormone and it’s absence will have causal effects on behavior), but just to …

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South African Apartheid: a case study on the effects of European colonialism in Africa

The impact of European colonialism on the world is often described as being profoundly negative. The popular view is that Europeans came, stole resources, destroyed cultures, and committed mass murder all over the earth. By contrast, the prevailing view 100 years ago was that Europe was supplying the world with advanced institutions which they would not develop on their own and, in so doing, was civilizing the world.

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What Race Were the Greeks and Romans?

Recent films about ancient Greece such as Troy, Helen of Troy, and 300, have used actors who are of Anglo-Saxon or Celtic ancestry (e.g. Brad Pitt, Gerard Butler). Recent films about ancient Rome, such as Gladiator and HBO’s series Rome, have done the same (e.g. Russell Crowe). Were the directors right, from an historical point of view? Were the ancient Greeks and Romans of North European stock?

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Welfare: Who’s on It, Who’s Not?

The Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) has published a report called “Welfare Use by Immigrant and Native Households.” The report’s principle finding is that fully 51 percent of immigrant households receive some form of welfare, compared to an already worrisomely high 30 percent of American native households. The study is based on the most accurate data available, the Census Bureau’s Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). It also reports stark racial differences in the use of welfare programs.

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First Worldism: A Holisis

My views on race differences did not come from some heavy-handed indoctrination from anyone. It came from looking at atlases and tables. I love tables and lists, when I’m bored I’ll make lists out of things just for fun. Murray Rothbard, when reading about regulatory policies of the US Federal Government, said that he didn’t set out to find some conspiracy – but that the conspiracies just popped right out at him. Seeing these conspiracies between industry and government was not a product of some analysis on Rothbard’s part at first. It was a holisis, or an immediate piecing together …

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Why I’m Not A Libertarian Anymore

I know not how the world will receive, nor how it may reflect on those that shall seem to favor it. For in a way beset with those that contend, on one side for too great Liberty, and on the other side for too much Authority, ‘tis hard to pass between the points of both unwounded. – Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan I am a former libertarian. I was exposed to libertarianism in high school, when I read The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged, and We the Living. I admired the rugged individualism of (((Ayn Rand’s))) protagonists, like Howard Roark, Hank Rearden, and Kira …

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Slavery in the United States

This is a jarring statement at first glance, but I think the evidence is pretty simple and clear. Perhaps to reduce emotionality, replace “slave” with “serf” or “peasant,” which is appropriate since in practice they were the same thing—one system had a Master who owned a slave, the other had a Lord who owned land that a serf was bound to work on.

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The Heritability of Political Views

The Iron Law of Heritability From Thomas Bouchard 2004: “As Rutter (2002) noted, ‘Any dispassionate reading of the evidence leads to the inescapable conclusion that genetic factors play a substantial role in the origins of individual differences with respect to all psychological traits, both normal and abnormal’ (p. 2). Put concisely, all psychological traits are heritable.”

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Changes in the American Black-White IQ Gap: 1916-2016

In this article, I am going to examine how the Black/White IQ gap has changed over time in the United States. After documenting basic trends, I’ll look at what caused the B/W IQ gap to shrink in the late 20th century. As will be seen, simplistic explanations based on changes in wealth and education are inadequate. We don’t know for sure why this convergence of test scores occurred, but desegregation is the most plausible hypothesis I have been able to come up with. We’ll also see that this narrowing of the IQ gap may have reflected a narrowing in test-taking ability rather …

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The Flaws of Meritocratic Immigration

The most compelling alternative to ethnic nationalism is what we might call “meritocrat” or “individualist” nationalism. This is a system in which people are allowed to migrate to a country on a meritocratic basis. In other words, whether a person is allowed to come into a country is solely determined by whether they are, in some respect, good enough. In the real world, these meritocratic criteria usually have to do with occupational status, health, and income. In theoretical discussions, the idea of only letting immigrants in who have a certain IQ score is also often brought up. This proposal has …

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Ethnocentrism: A Finer-Grained Look at How It Happened

In my earlier entry, we saw that the thing that made the difference between WEIRD Northwestern Europeans and their more clannish neighbors was the selective pressures that each underwent during their histories – particularly since the fall of Rome until the present. This era in time established the conditions in which different sorts of individuals survived and reproduced, eventually leading to the modern world as we know it. As before, it is to be understood that these differences have a genetic basis. That is, they are heritable. This means that genetic differences between different peoples lead to differences in their …

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Chalk and cheese

“Our Italian colleagues from University of Rome Tor Vergata and University of Parma proposed  an idea that [as far as] public feelings of security and trust in the judicial system, southern and northern Italy should be treated as two separate countries.  In their view, they are as different as chalk and cheese: in the northern part, the sense of necessity in terms of obeying the rules and moral condemnation of corruptive conduct in authoritative organs is much higher than in the South.”   (E.U. Ethics Standardization Team member)

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The Tsar is Far

No sort of philosophy of history, whether Slavophil or Westerniser, has yet solved the enigma,  why a most unstatelike people has created such an immense and mighty state,  why so anarchistic a people is so submissive to bureaucracy,  why a people free in spirit as it were does not desire a free life?  –Nikolai Berdyaev, 1915 The sky is high; the tsar is far.  –Russian proverb Two things have mystified the Francis Fukuyamas of the world about non-Western peoples and their way of ‘adopting democracy.’  One is these peoples’ annoying propensity to produce rulers who stuff urns, crack heads, and …

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Why Re-Colonization? Future Orientation

Each day, the Kung San walked long distances to the mongongo groves to collect their fruits.   Once he asked a tribesman why nobody had ever made an attempt to grow mongongo trees near some of the permanent water holes where the tribe resided.  “You could do that if you wanted to,” he replied, “but by the time the trees bore fruit, you would be long dead.” –Anthropologist Richard Lee

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