Recent Posts

Making Europeans Kinder, Gentler

Hanged, drawn, and quartered. Although the Middle Ages were, in the imagination of our contemporaries, “the time of the gallows,” the reality was appreciably different (Carbasse, 2011, pp. 38-39)
Like many well-meaning people, I once considered the death penalty a relic of a more barbaric age. Outside the old jailhouse, here in Quebec City, I can see the open space where people used to be hanged … in public. In some cases, the authorities would go one better. The body would be placed in a cage and suspended near a thoroughfare for all to see … while it decomposed. This was our past, and presumably the system of justice was even more gruesome longer ago.Actually, it wasn’t. Longer ago, the death penalty was not the preferred punishment for murder.

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A Tale Of Two Hate Crimes

The North East of England has a local newspaper called ”The Daily Chronicle” and last week the newspaper reported on two separate ”Hate Crimes”.  I thought it would be instructive to post both articles in full side by side so the reader can see for themselves the absolutely rancid double standards with which white people, English people, have to live. Pay special attention to the nature of the ”Hate Crimes” and their relative sentences…or lack thereof….

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Marching through the Institutions: A Review of No Campus for White Men

Scott Greer
No Campus for White Men
WND Books, 2017

The point of American conservatism is misdirection. It is a movement designed to fail, a program organized to lose, a racket masquerading as resistance. For that reason, much of what passes as “intellectual conservatism” is an attempt to disguise the obvious and to funnel political momentum into pointless dead ends. Even as European-America perceives that its country, culture, and future are slipping away, American conservatives are still babbling about the need to give tax cuts to billionaires, abolish Social Security, and start a nuclear war with Russia over Crimea. Be it out of stupidity or malevolence, you can always count on an American conservative to miss the point.

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CIVILIZATION IN ONE LESSON

What is the essence of civilization? This question lurks beneath every report of wartime atrocities, terrorist attacks, and heinous crimes. A conception of civilization is the unspoken presupposition undergirding every instance of moral outrage, virtue signaling and social prejudice. Civilization, more than race, class or ideology, is the unmentionable topic in a liberal multicultural society. After all, behavior differences between the races or psychological differences between the sexes are thrown in such sharp relief precisely because everyone holds in their mind an implicit image of the ideal social organization. Honor, politeness and racism lose all meaning if no one cares how anyone acts.

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The Flaws of Meritocratic Immigration

The most compelling alternative to ethnic nationalism is what we might call “meritocrat” or “individualist” nationalism. This is a system in which people are allowed to migrate to a country on a meritocratic basis. In other words, whether a person is allowed to come into a country is solely determined by whether they are, in some respect, good enough. In the real world, these meritocratic criteria usually have to do with occupational status, health, and income. In theoretical discussions, the idea of only letting immigrants in who have a certain IQ score is also often brought up.

This proposal has many attractive qualities. The most often cited problems with immigration, welfare abuse, crime, political ideology, etc., could seemingly be avoided by only allowing certain kinds of immigrants in. Why, then, should we care about what ethnic or racial group an immigrant belongs to?

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Ethnocentrism: A Finer-Grained Look at How It Happened

In my earlier entry, we saw that the thing that made the difference between WEIRD Northwestern Europeans and their more clannish neighbors was the selective pressures that each underwent during their histories – particularly since the fall of Rome until the present. This era in time established the conditions in which different sorts of individuals survived and reproduced, eventually leading to the modern world as we know it.

As before, it is to be understood that these differences have a genetic basis. That is, they are heritable. This means that genetic differences between different peoples lead to differences in their behavioral traits, which, collectively, manifests as cultural differences. We should be clear that all human behavioral traits are heritable, with “nurture” (as it’s commonly thought of) playing a minimal to nonexistent role in each. As John Derbyshire put it, “if dimensions of the individual human personality are heritable, then society is just a vector sum of a lot of individual personalities.” The rest of this entry proceeds assuming an understanding of this reality.

To recap, in Northwestern Europe it was bipartite manorialism that selected for a certain type of people not seen elsewhere in the world.

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Chalk and cheese

“Our Italian colleagues from University of Rome Tor Vergata and University of Parma proposed 
an idea that [as far as] public feelings of security and trust in the judicial system, southern and northern Italy should be treated as two separate countries. 
In their view, they are as different as chalk and cheese: in the northern part,
the sense of necessity in terms of obeying the rules and moral condemnation of corruptive conduct in authoritative organs is much higher than in the South.”  
(E.U. Ethics Standardization Team member)

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Black Woman Privilege

In 1985, a 19-year-old black woman named Donna participated along with six other perpetrators – three of them women – in the abduction, gruesome torture, and murder of a 60-year-old real estate broker, Thomas Vigliarolo. After gaining access to Vigliarolo by claiming to be prostitutes, the perpetrators drove him to a Harlem apartment, stripped him naked, tied him to a bed, and tortured him to death for over two weeks while demanding a ransom of $430,000.

One of the women explained why she shoved a yard-long metal rod up Vigliarolo’s rectum: “He was a homo anyway . . . When I stuck [it in] he wiggled.”

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The Tsar is Far

No sort of philosophy of history, whether Slavophil or Westerniser, has yet solved the enigma, 
why a most unstatelike people has created such an immense and mighty state, 
why so anarchistic a people is so submissive to bureaucracy, 
why a people free in spirit as it were does not desire a free life?  –Nikolai Berdyaev, 1915
The sky is high; the tsar is far.  –Russian proverb

Two things have mystified the Francis Fukuyamas of the world about non-Western peoples and their way of ‘adopting democracy.’  One is these peoples’ annoying propensity to produce rulers who stuff urns, crack heads, and throw opponents in prison.  The other is that even when such peoples do manage to squeeze out a ‘fair’ election, 50+% of them vote for some brutal lunkhead completely unpalatable to Right-Thinking Westerners:

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In Defense of “Anthropomorphism”

“I think you’re anthropomorphizing,” said the vet. I had brought the cat in for a routine checkup and was describing something cute she had done. I don’t remember what it was (this was some years ago). But it wasn’t the first time he had said this to me, and I had heard the same tiresome charge from others.

The context was usually when I was speaking about what I took to be emotional displays on the cat’s part, as well as displays of affection. And I carried on “anthropomorphizing” after the cat died and I lived for a couple of years with a roommate who had a dog – a dog to whom I became (predictably) very, very attached. I have been owned by two cats in my life and three dogs, if you count the one I “roomed” with. I have shared so much of my life with animals it seems strange now not to have one around (I am hesitant to get another pet, as I want to do some travelling).

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Why Re-Colonization? Future Orientation

Each day, the Kung San walked long distances to the mongongo groves to collect their fruits.  
Once he asked a tribesman why nobody had ever made an attempt to grow mongongo trees near some of the permanent water holes where the tribe resided.  “You could do that if you wanted to,” he replied, “but by the time the trees bore fruit, you would be long dead.” –Anthropologist Richard Lee

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Feeling the Other’s Pain

We don’t respond equally to signs of emotional distress in other people. In the Reign of Terror by Jessie Macgregor (1891)

 

We like to think that all people feel empathy to the same degree. In reality, it varies a lot from one person to the next, like most mental traits. We are half-aware of this when we distinguish between “normal people” and “psychopaths,” the latter having an abnormally low capacity for empathy. The distinction is arbitrary, like the one between “tall” and “short.” As with stature, empathy varies continuously among the individuals of a population, with psychopaths being the ones we find beyond an arbitrary cut-off point and who probably have many other things wrong with them. By focusing on the normal/abnormal dichotomy, we lose sight of the variation that occurs among so-called normal individuals. We probably meet people every day who have a low capacity for empathy and who nonetheless look and act normal. Because they seem normal, we assume they are as empathetic as we are. They aren’t.

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The Double Standard of Reproductive Rights

For a long time, the place where the double standards of feminism – and even, to some extent, those of mainstream society — were most clearly visible with regard to men has been on the subject of reproductive rights. The double standards are clearest here because, unlike other topics that require extensive research, this particular one is a built-in part of almost everyone’s everyday experience. Anyone who has ever had sex, been in a relationship, or contemplated having children will have experienced this double standard to some degree.

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A Fruitful Encounter

Adam and Eve, Jan Brueghel de Oude en Peter Paul Rubens

 

Did the Christian doctrine of original sin create the guilt cultures of Northwest Europe? Or did the arrow of causality run the other way?

By definition, gene-culture co-evolution is reciprocal. Genes and culture are both in the driver’s seat. This point is crucial because there is a tendency to overreact to cultural determinism and to forget that culture does matter, even to the point of influencing the makeup of our gene pool. Through culture, humans have directed their own evolution.

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IQ & academic success

According to a recent meta-analysis, the correlation between IQ and school grades in the general population is nearly 0.55. Meanwhile the correlation between IQ and years of education in the U.S. is also 0.55.  Given the similarity between these two correlations, we can think of them both as just the 0.55 correlation between IQ and academic success.

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Regression to the Mean

I am taller than the average American male. This can only be for a combination of two reasons: genes and the environment. I have no idea which environmental factors might have made me taller than average, so if my height advantage is part genetic and part environmental in origin I will probably only pass on the genetic portion to my children. Unless they, by sheer luck, also get the same environmental advantages I did, they will be more like the average person, in terms of height, than I am, but still somewhat taller than average due to my genes. They will have regressed towards the population mean.

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We are All Egoists – and Why That’s a Good Thing

Many of those who end up exploring the political fringe – particularly on the Right – end up obsessed with various forms of what might loosely be called egocentricity. In those of a libertarian bent, this usually expresses itself as an obsession with contrasting honorable “individualism” against slavish “collectivism.” In the more anarchic and nihilistic types, it often expresses itself as an obsession with contrasting proud “egoism” against naïve “altruism.”

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Transracial Adoption and the Black-White IQ Gap

In the United States, Blacks score about 15 points lower on IQ tests than Whites do (Roth et al., 2001). There is a debate about why. On the one hand, there are “hereditarians” who argue that this gap is due to a mixture of genetic and environmental causes and that both factors contribute a significant amount to the gap. On the other hand, there are “environmentalists” or “egalitarians” who argue that the gap is 100% caused by the environment.

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